Project managers Project managers

The discussion is closed now. However, if you think something should have been said during the ODE,  you are welcome to add it to one the discussion threads.

 

Welcome to the first DESIRE Online Discussion Event for project managers. The discussion is open from 17 to 19 September 2012 and is moderated by Marisa Hernandez from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

The themes to be discussed during the events:

Day 1
The first day will focus on the various communication channels project managers usually use to find out about results from science education projects.

Day 2
On the second day, participants will discuss their experience in communication and disseminating results of their projects.

Day 3
The third day will aim at identifying best practices in disseminating STEM project results to target audiences.

Document Library Document Library

Folder # of Folders # of Documents  
documents
Subfolders: Publications
1 43
Showing 1 result.

Meet the expert - Marisa Hernández Meet the expert - Marisa Hernández

Marisa HernandezMarisa Hernandez is a research assistant and member of the Executive Board of the Centre for Research in Science and Mathematics Education (CRECIM) of the Universitat Autònoma of Barcelona, Spain. She  has a BA in Physics and PhD in Science Education.

With a staff of 9 full-time employees, 5 part-time secondary school teachers, and 3 PhD students, CRECIM manages a number of national projects and local initiatives on science and technology education. They cover a broad range of topics, from digital classrooms in science lessons (ADIGIC) and technology enhanced science learning for children in hospital (TEACH); to school-university (REVIR) and school-industry (Prat de la Riba) collaboration.

On the European scene, CRECIM has been actively involved in the management of several EU-funded projects: STISS, IKUITSE, Materials Science, TRACES and ECB/inGenious.

 

Categories (Project managers) Categories (Project managers)
Combination View Flat View Tree View
Threads [ Previous | Next ]
Improving our dissemination strategies
toggle
What are the first ideas that come to your mind if we try to brainstorm on how it is possible to improve dissemination of project results to teachers and other stakeholders?
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 15:41 as a reply to Marisa Hernandez.
Some teachers could be involved in the project since the beginning... And then relay to their peers!
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 17:29 as a reply to Didier Laval.
I agree with Didier to a certain point. I think it is important to select which teachers can actually play this role with their peers. The other question is, how far will this method go? how many teachers can you reach this way?

As for other stakeholders, it is quite common in the UK to have a steering committee for projects where stakeholders are kept up to date with the developments of the project and can give their opinion. This seems to me the best way at regional/national level. I would like to hear about other ways of reaching stakeholders.
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 18:36 as a reply to Marisa Hernandez.
Including information on innovative science education methods and tools in in-service training, making sure future teachers get used to prepare their lessons with the results of research projects
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 18:41 as a reply to Jaume Ametller.
Jaume Ametller:
I agree with Didier to a certain point. I think it is important to select which teachers can actually play this role with their peers. The other question is, how far will this method go? how many teachers can you reach this way?


Jaume, this is a key issue. It seems to me that when one of the main aims of a dissemination plan is to reach as many teachers as possible to try to have a significant impact in practice, then face-to-face strategies become more difficult to carry out. I know of projects with large fundings which promote cascade models of dissemination, in which a first group of teachers is more actively involved during the project and is trained or informed about the results of the project during the lifetime of the project. Then, these teachers are responsible for disseminating the results to other teachers from their local, regional or national community. Again, I think the big challenge is how to involve a large number of stakeholders. There is a need for support from institutions at different scales and in differents aspects. What kind of supportive structure do you think that would be necessary for carrying out cascade models of dissemination?
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 19:15 as a reply to Marisa Hernandez.
Involving teachers in the dissemination itself can be a good starting point.

Inviting teachers to present the project and what they have done at dissemination events for instance. This recognized the critical role of teachers in the project and also make the teacher feel part of a group that he is representing.

By taking part in such activities, teachers gain recognition from their peers and a type of legitimacy to advice them. It can therefore encourage teachers to continue to spread the word about their practices among their peers.
Flag Flag
RE: Improving our dissemination strategies
18/09/12 19:29 as a reply to Maite Debry.
Maite Debry:
Including information on innovative science education methods and tools in in-service training, making sure future teachers get used to prepare their lessons with the results of research projects


Then, we should promote that research projects remain close or get closer to institutions in charge of (pre-service and in-service) professional development and especifically include actions for training/informing people in charge of professional development. I think that we should include and carefully plan the role of intermediate stakeholders in any dissemination strategy.
Flag Flag
Latest discussions Latest discussions
RE: What to disseminate?
19/09/12 17:15
I also consider that we should choose carefully the channel and the format to disseminate our project results to different stakeholders.

I recall now attending a conference about knowledge transfer, where there was a policy-maker from the European Commission. She told the audience, mainly constituted by researchers and project managers, that one common mistake concerning dissemination of results is to send them (policy-makers) large reports and mainly at the end of the project instead of policy briefings or similar documents which have been revised and agreed with policy-makers during the lifetime of the project.

Regarding teachers, I agree with Maite that teachers are interested in knowing ways to effectively implement in class the products (e.g. educational materials) resulting from a project. However, if the resulting products have been pilot tested in class and there exist research results about how the products work in real settings and how to use them quite efficiently, then I wonder what it is a good format to disseminate these products to other teachers. You need to include specific materials that have been developed within the project accompanied by recommendations on how to use them, possible difficulties that teachers may encounter, the aims of these materials, etc. Are there formats that work well for you to communicate your results to teachers?
RE: What to disseminate?
19/09/12 16:03
When communicating your project to teachers, I believe it is important to explain concretely the contributions he/she can give and how the tools/resources/method can practically be impemented in class for example (incl. time needed, target age group, ...)

An important information to provide is also the link that can be done with the curriculum.
RE: What to disseminate?